Economy Measure Code Measure Currency Code Amount (Local) Amount (USD) Source Details
Afghanistan 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#U (accessed 9 July 2020)

(i) Screening at ports of entry, quarantine for infected people, and closure of public places for gathering; (ii) Quarantine for infected people; (iii) Closure of public places for gathering; (iv) Social distancing measures, including a three-week lockdown of Kabul (March 28) and Ghazni (April 1) and restricting daily movements to those deemed essentiall (v) Extended the border closures until April 9; (vi) Social distancing measures have included 20 provinces, including Kabul and some other cities, instituting lockdown measures, extended for two weeks on April 12; (vii) Social distancing measures have been extended for 3 weeks on April 17; (viii) Both Houses of Afghanistan’s parliament were put on lockdown on April 29 until end of the national lockdown; (ix) The government also released over 5,300 prisoners to reduce the risk of mass infections in penitentiaries; (x) Schools and universities will remain closed until September; (xi) By end-June, the authorities announced the resumption of domestic and international flights and exports to Europe via the air corridors.

Argentina 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 27 April 2020).

The country has adopted full closure of borders and a nation-wide quarantine, beginning on March 20 and lasting until at least April 26, including closed borders.

Armenia 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 10 June 2020). Asbarez. http://asbarez.com/196752/armenia-ends-covid-19-state-of-emergency-keeps-safety-measures-in-place/ (accessed 17 September 2020)

No amount/estimate: The government declared a national state of emergency on March 16, and imposed strict containment measures, including school closures, travel bans on foreign citizens from high risk countries, and imposed fines to those who violate isolation orders during the state of emergency. As of September 11, this state of emergency has been lifted, with continuing regulations mandating the use of facial coverings in public places, strict enforcement of social distancing and hygiene protocols.

Australia 12 - Non-Economic Measures Department of Health, Australian Government. https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert/government-response-to-the-covid-19-outbreak (accessed on 05 May 2020); Government of Australia COVID19 official website. https://www.australia.gov.au/coronavirus-updates (accessed 3 June 2020); Department of Health. https://www.health.gov.au/news/state-quarantine-requirements-for-interstate-travel (accessed 22 July 2020); Department of Health. https://www.health.gov.au/news/should-i-wear-a-face-mask-in-public-0 (accessed 30 July 2020).

March: (i) Travel restrictions, screening travelers who arrive in Australia and ensuring they self-isolate on arrival, continuing with border surveillance; (ii Enforcing social distancing measures, testing people suspected of the disease, and isolating people with the virus and their close contacts; (iii) Increasing of health system capacity; (iv) Delivering support to Australians experiencing domestic, family, and sexual violence due to the fallout of coronavirus; (v) Putting limits on some prescription and over the counter medications, to make sure those who need them can access them; (vi) April 26, The COVIDSafe app is available for voluntary download to speed up contacting people exposed to coronavirus; (vii) May 8, The National Cabinet will consider the first phase of easing COVID-19 restrictions. Some states and territories have begun easing selected regional restrictions; (viii) July 14, State and territory governments have imposed a range of interstate travel restrictions, including the closure of certain state borders and 14-day quarantine period upon arrival of travellers; (ix) July 30, the government published guidance on wearing face masks.

Austria 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 October 2020).

(i) The authorities have progressively tightened containment measures between mid-March and mid-April. Initially targeted to travel to and from Italy and self-quarantine for people with symptoms, the measures progressed to bans on large gathering in public spaces, replacing schools, and university classes with home learnings, and isolation of several ski resorts. By March 16, leaving home was banned by law with limited exceptions. For all judicial and administrative procedures, the clock was put on hold to avoid hardship due to missed deadlines. (ii) April 13, gradual re-opening of the economy has started, from small shops, construction and garden centers, while other stores and hairdressers were allowed to open at the beginning of May. By mid-May when religious services, outdoor sports, museums, libraries, and archives reopened, and the Bundesliga was allowed to restart. Open air markets and business premises are exempted from the mandate on mouth and nose protective masks since June 1. The re-opening process is expected to last through June though some steps were accelerated recently due to low infection rates, such as the reopening of the borders with Germany, Switzerland, Lichtenstein, Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary from June 5; (iii) June 15, the standing obligation for all persons to wear a face mask was limited to public transportation, pharmacies and services when a 1-meter distance cannot be maintained, or no other protective measures are available; (iv) June 16, travelling restrictions were lifted for most European countries; (v) July 24, pickup in the infection rate in some areas has prompted the authorities to tighten previously relaxed containment measures such as mandatory mask wearing in some areas. In September, this tightening extended to indoors and public institutions. [update]

Azerbaijan 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 24 July 2020); US Embassy in Azerbaijan. https://az.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information-for-azerbaijan/ (accessed 15 July 2020).

(i) To contain the spread of COVID-19, the authorities have introduced a special quarantine regime (until June 15). It includes border closures, required quarantine of returning citizens, prohibition of mass gatherings, and restriction on domestic movements; (ii) The COVID-19 Operational Headquarters has been created under the Cabinet of Ministers, and working groups within various ministries and the CBA have been tasked with developing specific measures. These restrictions are being slowly relaxed starting May 4; (iii) July, Because of the increasing cases of infections, the government announced the decision to prolong a strict quarantine regime until July 20 and special quarantine regime until August 1 .

Bangladesh 12 - Non-Economic Measures Ministry of Public Administration. https://mopa.gov.bd/sites/default/files/files/mopa.gov.bd/notices/8b82fa43_9c1a_4269_bc9f_dcf378e47fdf/admin1-2020-347-r1.PDF (accsessed 29 June 2020). IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 May 2020).

(i) March 23, The government declared a general holiday from March 26 to April 4, which has been extended until May 5: government offices, private offices, and courts will be closed, commercial banks will operate shorter hours; (ii) Individuals have been requested not to leave their homes except to collect daily necessities and emergency supplies, and to wear masks when outside; and (iii) A lockdown has been imposed on 75 hotspots in Dhaka where cases have been identified, and a curfew is in operation from 6pm to 6am.

Belgium 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 October 2020).

(i) The minority government-which has been granted enhanced executive powers-has implemented a range of measures to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, including school and retail shop closures, a ban on all gatherings, limiting movement to essential needs, ban of non-essential travel abroad; (ii) The government has announced a phased conditional on health outcomes. On this basis, manufacturing and business services sectors were reopened on May 4, to be followed by shops (May 11 and May 18). Schools will also start to gradually reopen from May 18. The reopening of other sectors and overseas travel will be assessed by June 8, while sporting events remain banned until July 31; (iii) June 11, Hospitality, cultural, and non-contact sports activities (without audience) as well as religious services were allowed to resume as of June 8. Domestic travel restrictions have been lifted; (iv) June 18, travel restrictions within the Schengen area have also been lifted; (v) July 23, Due to the recent rise in the number of new cases, the government decided to put the 5th phase of reopening on hold, imposed new preventive measures and further decentralized decision making regarding mask wearing to local authorities; (vi) August 20, the government decided to ease some restrictions, while keeping social distancing rules in place until at least end-September. For instance, shopping and events are now permitted; (vii) Schools, except universities, have fully reopened in September, with in-person classes. [update]

Bhutan 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 24 July 2020); PMO. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/?p=1606 (accessed 20 July 2020); Royal Government of Bhutan. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/?p=1664 (accessed 11 August 2020); Royal Government of Bhutan. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/31-08-20-press-release-pmo/ (accessed 02 September 2020); Royal Government of Bhutan. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/10-09-20-press-release-on-the-completion-of-the-unlocking-period-pmo/ (accessed 11 September 2020).

(i) Bhutan started imposing containment measures immediately after the first case was recorded on March 6, with restriction of entry of foreign tourists initially for two weeks but extended afterwards and closure of schools in three cities; (ii) March 22, Bhutan sealed off its land borders as a precautionary measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. For non-Bhutanese, exits are allowed. Incoming non-Bhutanese are scrutinized and quarantined where applicable; (iii) March 27, More containment measures were imposed on public gatherings, travel (within and outside Bhutan), business and entertainment, games and sports and civil service, corporate, private, and other agencies. The quarantine period has been extended to April 21; (iv) Healthcare measures include setting up dedicated hospitals and quarantine centers; (v) June 19, Easing of restrictions, which will be done in phases, in schools, institutes, and colleges, except pre-primary levels, low risk businesses, sports, trainings and workshops, religious and social functions, parks and public spaces, and public transport; (vi) June 19, All government, corporate, and allied agencies are called to discontinue "work from home" starting June 22; (vii) August 11, Government announces nationwide lockdown. On September 1, The government announced a phased easing of lockdown restrictions between September 1 and 10. On September 10, the Government released new guidelines on the movement of individuals throughout the country.

Brazil 12 - Non-Economic Measures KPMG. https://home.kpmg/xx/en/home/insights/2020/03/flash-alert-2020-119.html (accessed 29 April 2020).

(i) Several travel restrictions for individuals coming to Brazil (Venezuela, Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, and Suriname, Uruguay, the People’s Republic of China, the European Union member states, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, the United Kingdom & Northern Ireland, Australia, Japan, and Malaysia); (ii) Brazil’s population has been advised to stay at home in self-isolation as much as possible; (iii) Businesses have largely adhered to this policy and have requested that their employees work remotely or take early vacation; (iv) No nationwide lockdown, but 23 of Brazil's 27 federative units (states) have imposed confinement measures; (v) Schools are not closed nationwide, but several states and municipalities have closed educational institutions. For example, in São Paulo, schools have been closed since 23/3.

Brunei Darussalam 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 May 2020, 14 May 2020).

(i) The government is actively responding to the risks of the pandemic from spreading further by implementing a range of measures, including strict inbound and outbound travel restrictions and banning all mass gatherings, including weddings and sporting events; and (ii) The Ministry of Health (MOH) is also stepping up efforts to track close contacts of positive cases; (vi) MOH actively rolling out a contact tracing app (“BruHealth”) for residents to download before they are given the green light to visit public places.

Cambodia 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 24 July 2020).

April: (i) The government has announced foreigners wishing to travel to Cambodia the need to obtain a visa at a Cambodian diplomatic mission abroad, a health certificate before departure, and sufficient travel insurance; (ii) Quarantine and self-isolation measures; (iii) Schools and casinos are closed and the government has banned public events with more than 50 participants; (iv) The Khmer New Year break has been cancelled; (v) May 20, The authorities have lifted the entry ban on citizens from Iran, Italy, Germany, Spain, France, and the US.

Canada 12 - Non-Economic Measures International Monetary Fund. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#C (accessed 10 June 2020).

(i) Travel restrictions; (ii) Social distancing measures; (iii) Declarations of states of emergency; (iv) Closures of non-essential businesses in some provinces; (v) Reopening the economy. On April 28, Prime Minister Trudeau released a joint statement with premiers across Canada on their shared public health approach to support restarting the economy; all provinces have begun to implement plans to reopen.

Cook Islands 12 - Non-Economic Measures COVID-19 Cook Islands Response. https://covid19.gov.ck/?v=1588300681872 (1 May 2020).

(i) April 16, Prime Minister, Hon. Henry Puna, declared the Cook Islands "a COVID-19 free zone", however the country remains in Code Yellow with relaxed restrictions; and (ii) Restrictions have been lifted for the following areas (a) schools are now open, (b) travel between the Pa Enua (Outer Islands) open, (c) churches are now open, (d) social gatherings are no longer limited to 10 people, (e) alcohol retail sales extended until 6pm, (f) non-contact sports may resume, and (g) restaurants & cafes may re-open.

Denmark 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 12 April 2020). The Local Denmark. https://www.thelocal.dk/20200517/denmark-begins-next-stage-of-reopening-after-lockdown (accessed 21 May 2020)

(i) People returning from abroad are strongly encouraged to self-quarantine for two weeks. Borders have been closed and entry are only allowed for citizens and others with a critical reason to enter (e.g. work or visit sick family member). EU border restrictions apply as well. Borders remain fully open to transport of goods and capital flows. Air traffic is de facto shut down. All schools, childcare and education facilities were closed, but have gradually begun reopening as of May 20. Teaching continues through online distance learning platforms. The government has banned gatherings of more than 10 people (inside as well as outside), except in work places. Only food stores, pharmacies and stores allowing sufficient physical distance are allowed to remain open. All restaurants, bars and cultural premises as well personal services not allowing sufficient physical distance (e.g. hairdressers) are required to close; (ii) The authorities announced careful and gradual lift of some containment measures such as the opening of daycares, kindergartens and schools (up to 5th grade) by April 15 while others remain in place till May (e.g. no events with more than 10 people, closure of borders) and August (e.g. large gatherings). The gradual opening of the economy was extended to include additional health care sectors and liberal professions . The authorities adjusted the criteria for COVID-19 testing to enable a comprehensive testing of the population as part of the reopening strategy.

European Central Bank 12 - Non-Economic Measures
Arab Republic of Egypt 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 October 2020).

(i) April 28, A Presidential decree published in the Official Gazette declared the state of emergency across the country for three months; (ii) The authorities have taken a host of precautionary measures to improve testing as well as to limit the community spread of the virus, including (a) setting up testing centers, (b) imposing a nighttime curfew, (c) temporarily closing places of worship, (d) temporarily halting all air travel, (e) encouraging civil servants to work from home in non-essential sectors, (f) closing all malls, gyms, sporting clubs, in-dining restaurants and cafes; (iii) Authorities have also suspended the export of all types of legumes for a period of 3 months and plan to start increasing strategic food reserves to meet domestic deman; (iv) Egypt’s Health Ministry released a 3-stage plan outlining required procedures in preparation for the gradual easing of restrictions within the country; (v) Starting July 2020, there will be a gradual re-opening of the economy – air travel will resume, restaurants and cafes will open with 25 percent capacity, stores will close at 9 pm while restaurants and cafes will close at 10 pm, public parks and beaches will remain closed until further notice, public transportation will operate between 4 am and midnight, places of worship will be open for daily prayers but main prayers like Friday prayers and masses will not be allowed, cinemas, theaters, and entertainment venues will operate with 25 percent capacity; (vi) All parks and specialized gardens around Cairo will open to the public starting on August 26, 2020, with a maximum capacity of 50%. Starting September 21, funeral prayers and wedding ceremonies held in open-air venues have been allowed, for a maximum limit of 300 people. [update]

European Union 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 29 April 2020).

Most European countries have taken several containment measures ranging from lockdowns and travel restrictions to school closures and bans on large gatherings. Measures that favor teleworking were also widely implemented. The European Commission presented guidelines for exit strategies and called for a common framework across member states. The criteria include: (i) sustained reduction and stabilization of new cases, (ii) sufficient health system capacity such as adequate hospital beds, pharmaceutical products, and equipment, and (iii) appropriate monitoring capacity to quickly detect and isolate infected individuals as well as to trace contacts. The Commission invited Schengen Member States and Schengen Associated States to extend the temporary restriction on non-essential travel to the EU until 15 June and presented further guidance on a gradual lifting of border restrictions .

Fiji 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 23 July 2020).

(i) The authorities have been proactive in their efforts to keep the virus out of Fiji by early imposition of travel restrictions; (ii) They reacted to the first confirmed case with a broad set of measures, including reinforced detection measures, restrictions on movements and gatherings, closures of schools and certain types of businesses (e.g. cinemas, gyms, etc.), a nationwide curfew and lockdowns of affected areas; and (iii) As the number of cases have remained constant since Mid-April, the authorities started relaxing containment and mitigation restrictions at the national level on April 26th; (iv) June 4, no new cases have been detected as of the past 30 days, and the last active case was cleared by authorities; (v) June 21, Phase 2 of Fiji’s COVID-safe Economic Recovery Plan leads to the gradual easing of some restrictions (e.g. national curfew, limitations on public gatherings) and the reopening of schools and certain recreational facilities under strict conditions. The reopening of the economy under Phase 2 has been tied up with the launch of CareFIJI, a contact-tracing mobile application; (vi) July 16, The repatriation of Fijian citizens in July led to a resurgence of border cases – all quarantined in government-designated facilities.

Finland 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (1 May 2020); IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#C (acccessed 13 August 2020); IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#C (accessed 3 October 2020).

March 16, the government invoked the Emergency Powers Act, which was used to close borders, restrict domestic movements, and expand service obligations of essential health-, social services-, and security personnel. Restrictions to and from the region of Helsinki were lifted on April 14. On May 4, the government announced a plan to lift broad restrictions in favor of more targeted containment measures, including: on May 14, resumption of primary and lower secondary school and cross-border movement of essential traffic; on June 1, reopening of restaurants and public facilities and limits on public gatherings increased from 10 to 50 people; on July 31, resumption of public events with more than 500 people. Effective June 16, the government repealed the use of powers under the Emergency Powers Act, declaring that the country is no longer in a state of emergency. Barring any significant setbacks, the restrictions on gatherings will be lifted altogether on October 1. On June 23, the government announced the lifting of internal border control and restrictions on traffic between Finland and countries with similar incidence of COVID-19 with a limit value of 8 new cases per 100,000 persons in the previous 14 days. As of July 13, travel between Finland and non-EU countries on the ‘green list’ approved by the Council of the European Union will be permitted subject to restrictions which depend on the incidence of COVID-19. On August 13, the government adopted resolutions on recommendations for wearing face coverings and face masks, and for remote work. On August 18, the government reinstated travel restrictions on traffic between Finland and several countries based on their 14-day incidence rates. This is in addition to entry restrictions for three countries introduced on August 6. The government adopted on September 11 a decision to continue internal border checks and restrictions on border traffic, which entered into force on September 19 and will continue through October 18. The government also adopted a resolution on a hybrid strategy for cross-border traffic and travel which requires a rapid increase in cross-border testing capacity and analysis by 10,000 tests/day. This would allow a more flexible approach to border restrictions. On September 24, the government reintroduced travel restrictions between Finland and several Schengen area countries [update].

France 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 21 May 2020); IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#C (accessed 3 October 2020).

The government has implemented a range of measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19, including school closures, the ban of all non-essential outings and long-distance travel, and the introduction of night-time curfews in some cities. On May 11, France started to gradually ease the containment measures, beginning with the reopening of primary schools, shops, and industry, on a differentiated regional basis. Internal travel restrictions have also been relaxed and the use of masks is obligatory for public transport. As of May 11, France started to ease the containment measures, beginning with the reopening of primary schools, shops, and industry, on a differentiated regional basis. Most major domestic restrictions were lifted as of June 22. Internal and intra-European travel restrictions have also been lifted. In response to the recent uptick in infections, limits on large gatherings have been extended until the end of October, testing ramped up, and mask mandates tightened with the use of masks obligatory in most public spaces and indoor areas (including workplaces). A digital contact tracing application was launched by the government on June 2. In response to the recent uptick in infections, limits on large gatherings have been extended until the end of October, testing ramped up, and mask mandates tightened with the use of masks obligatory in most public spaces and indoor areas (including schools and workplaces). Selective regional restrictions have also been imposed in high-infection areas including Paris [update].

Federated States of Micronesia 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 12 April 2020).

(i) The national and state governments have introduced travel restrictions; banning or requiring 14-day self-quarantine prior to entry into the Federated States of Micronesia; and restricting residents from traveling abroad; and (ii) The state of Chuuk closed schools.

Georgia 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 17 September 2020); WTO. https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/covid19_e/trade_related_goods_measure_e.htm (accessed 30 July 2020).

(i) The government has declared a national state of emergency (lifted since May 22) and adopted containment measures, including social distancing, lock down of high-risk districts, closure of border crossing, travel ban for foreign visitors, quarantine for nationals returning to Georgia, closure of shops (other than groceries and gas stations) and schools. Georgian railways resumed June 15, with the passenger train routes: Tbilisi-Batumi, Tbilisi-Zugdidi, Tbilisi-Poti, Tbilisi-Ozurgeti, Tbilisi-Kutaisi. Georgian National Tourism Administration says local travelers are able to visit different parts of Georgia for tourism from today; re-opening of international tourism has been postponed to September, but with the requirement of holding valid PCR test results for all foreign arrivals; (ii) A mandatory curfew is now in place, requiring the population to remain indoors from 21:00 to 06:00; (iii) All individuals must carry an identity document when outside of their dwelling (on foot or otherwise). Stricter restrictions on movement are in place for individuals aged 70 and above; (iv) Other forms of economic activity, including tourism, has come to a standstill. As of May 5, construction, production of construction materials, carwash, computer and equipment repair shops, and parks will open; (v) Effective 3 April 2020 to 10 May 2020, Temporary export ban on diagnostic or laboratory reagents on a backing, prepared diagnostic or laboratory reagents whether or not on a backing, etc.; (vi) Effective July 13, outdoor cultural events and indoor rehearsals are allowed. Public outdoor gatherings of less than 200 people is also allowed.

Germany 12 - Non-Economic Measures OECD. http://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/en/ (accessed 11 April 2020, 15 May 2020, 21 May 2020, 16 July 2020) ; DW https://bit.ly/2YiaGiT (accessed 8 May 2020); BBC. https://www.bbc.com/news/explainers-52575313 (accessed 28 May 2020); Reuters. https://reut.rs/37MQtVA (accessed 4 June 2020); Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-germany-tests/germany-begins-mass-coronavirus-testing-at-airports-idUSKCN24U2DG (accessed 30 July 2020); Daily Sabah. https://www.dailysabah.com/world/europe/german-children-start-new-school-year-amid-virus-fears?gallery_image=undefined#big (accessed 4 August 2020); Die Bundesregierung. https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/aktuelles/pflichtests-kommen-1774748 (accessed 8 August 2020); Die Bundesregierung. https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/aktuelles/bund-laender-beschluesse-1780542 (accessed 29 August 2020).

(i) Contact ban for meetings of more than two individuals in public, with exemption for household members, have been decided on March 22 across the country, extended until at least May 4 on April 15. The Federal States of Bavaria, Saarland, and Saxony have introduced stricter lockdowns; (ii) Reintroduction of border controls at the internal Schengen borders to France, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Denmark, Italy, Spain, and Austria, with restriction on entry since March 16 and 19. Goods and commuters are allowed to cross the border. On April 2, the government agreed to exceptionally allow seasonal agricultural workers to enter the country under strict requirements after seasonal workers have generally been denied entry from March 25 onward. Travel warning for all countries in place until the end of April. In accordance with the decision at the European level, individuals from outside the EU, with few exceptions, cannot enter the country for at least 30 days starting March 18; (iii) Most schools and day care centers are closed until mid-April; (iv) Restaurants are closed. Nonessential stores, leisure, and cultural facilities have been closed since March 15 and 16. Larger events were cancelled until end-August; (v) May 10, The contact ban for meetings in public decided on March 22 has been extended until June 5 but eased such that multiple members of two households can meet in public; (vi) May 10, Travel warning for all countries initially in place until the end of April has been extended until at least mid-June; (vii) A gradual reopening of stores began on April 20. Some states have allowed reopening of restaurants from May 8 onwards. Other states will follow gradually over the course of May including the re-opening of hotels; (viii) May 6, border controls to neighboring countries will be gradually lifted; (ix) May 28, Control of lifting the downlockdown lies on the federal states. Shops are allowed to reopen and schools have been partially reopened. Border controls were eased on May 15 with Austria, France and Switzerland and will be lifted on June 15. Big public events like festivals are banned until at least the end of August. Social distancing rules extended until June 29; (x) June 3, Germany will lift a travel ban for European Union member states plus Britain, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland from 15 June as long as there are no entry bans or large-scale lockdowns in those countries; (xi) June 16, The government launched a Corona-Warn app that allows users to trace potential contact with COVID-infected individuals. Its use is voluntary; (xii) June 17, Containment measures re-imposed in two municipalities in the state of North-Rhine Westphalia after a resurgence in new COVID-19 cases (“emergency brake"). Restrictions were eased on 6 July; (xiii) July, A general contact restriction of keeping distance and wearing masks in stores and public transport should continue until further notice; (xiv) July 29, Free and compulsory coronavirus testing begins at Berlin's Tegel airport. Other airports such as Frankfurt have been offering tests over the previous weeks, but additional preparations are being made to test passengers arriving from countries deemed high risk; (xv) August 3, new school year begins with children returning to school in the Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania region. Germany's 16 states had agreed that schools will reopen full-time after the summer break; (xvi) August 8, Mandatory corona tests for returnees from risk areas begins. Tests are free for the travelers; (xvii) August 27, Returnees from risk areas should be able to end their quarantine at the earliest with a test from the fifth day after their return. The federal states will set the minimum fine for violations of the mask requirement of at least EUR50. There is a ban on major events, where contact tracking and compliance with hygiene regulations, are not possible until at least the end of 2020.

Hong Kong, China 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#P (accessed 27 May 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-hongkong/new-virus-cluster-spurs-hong-kong-to-extend-border-curbs-and-limit-on-gatherings-idUSKBN2390LS?il=0 (accessed 5 June 2020). SMCP. https://www.scmp.com/business/companies/article/3087908/hong-kong-relax-quarantine-rules-largest-listed-firms-such (accessed 9 June 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-hongkong/hong-kong-tightens-social-distancing-again-as-coronavirus-cases-rise-idUSKCN24E1L5?il=0 (accessed 14 July 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-hongkong-masks/hong-kong-mandates-masks-in-all-indoor-public-areas-idUSKCN24N0MB?il=0 (accessed 23 July 2020). Reuters. https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1313249/hong-kong-to-ban-dining-in-public-gatherings-of-more-than-two (accessed 28 July 2020). The Straits Times. https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/coronavirus-hong-kong-reverses-virus-ban-on-restaurant-dining (accessed 31 July 2020).

Authorities imposed strict containment measures including: (i) School closures; (ii) Remote work arrangement for civil servants; (iii) Ban on gatherings of more than four people in a public place; (iv) Compulsory quarantine for travelers from overseas countries for 14 days. On June 8, Authorities eased the 14-day quarantine rule for executives of the 480 largest companies listed in the city; (v) Temporary entry ban of nonresident from overseas countries from March 25; (vi) Reduction and partial suspension of cross-border transport and border control point services, including suspension of transit services at the Hong Kong International Airport. (vii) Closure of selected social gathering establishments and businesses until May 7, 2020. (viii) Remote work for civil servants was lifted on May 4th and the first phase of school reopening slated on May 27th. (ix) Religious gatherings of up to 50% of venue capacity were allowed starting May 18 and cultural and leisure facilities including libraries, swimming pools, and beaches reopened on May 21. (x) June 2, Authorities extended a ban on gatherings of more than 8 people by 2 weeks as well as restrictions on foreign visitors until mid-September. (xi) July 13, Authorities reimposed tighter social distancing measures including limiting gatherings to 4 people, a one-week shutdown of 12 types of establishments such as gyms and gaming centres, and limits on restaurant takeaway operations after 6 PM. (xii) July 23, Authorities expanded stricter containment measures including mandatory mask-wearing in all indoor public areas including malls and markets. As of July 28, Authorities further tightened restrictions with a ban on dine-services at restaurants and limiting public gatherings to no more than 2 people. The ban on dine-in services was later modified to a restriction to 50% capacity.

India 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 17 September 2020).

(i) March 21, A temporary ban for a week on international flights landing in the country for a week; (ii) March 26, Extended ban on all international flights till April 15th, excluding approved all-cargo operations and flights; (iii) March 5, Schools closed in some of the municipalities and states, including Delhi until the end of March, which was eventually expanded to all educational insttitutions in the country; (iv) March 12, Partial shutdowns was imposed on educational institutions, stadiums, cinema halls, and sports clubs and gathering of people were banned in some of the states, including Delhi; (v) March 24, The entire country was placed under lockdown for 21 days which, on April 14, was further extended to May 17; (vi) April 15, the government announced several relaxation measures in geographical areas designated as non-hotspot, with effect from April 20, 2020; (vii) May 30, the government issued ‘Unlock 3.0’ guidelines for a phased re-opening of most activities across the country and limiting the lockdown only to containment zones for a month until June 30. However, states have been empowered to prohibit certain activities if they deem it necessary; (viii) On August 29, the government issued new guidelines (‘Unlock 4.0’) to further re-open the economy in September, removing restrictions on metro rail, and allowing for social, academic, sports, entertainment, and other congregations of up to 100 people. Education institutions will remain closed until end-September, with lockdowns continuing to be implemented in containment zones.

Indonesia 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#P (accessed 5 May 2020). OECD. http://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/en/ (accessed 5 May 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-indonesia-haj/indonesia-cancels-haj-pilgrimage-over-coronavirus-concerns-idUSKBN2390QO?il=0 (accessed 2 June 2020). The Straits Times. https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/covid-19-jakarta-eases-restrictions-in-transition-phase-strict-health-protocols-remain (accessed 4 June 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-indonesia-flights/indonesia-resumes-domestic-air-travel-coronavirus-cases-jump-idUSKBN23G147?il=0 (accessed 9 June 2020). BI. https://www.bi.go.id/en/ruang-media/info-terbaru/Pages/Perkembangan-Terkini-Perekonomian-dan-Langkah-BI-dalam-Hadapi-COVID-19-5-Juni-2020.aspx (accessed 10 June 2020).

(i) The government has adopted various containment measures, including temporary bans on domestic and international air and sea travel, screening at ports of entry, school closures, other restrictions on public events, and obligations on masks and reduced transportation. The government has also banned Indonesia’s traditional annual exodus for Muslim holidays in an effort to curb the spread of the virus from Jakarta and other high-risk regions. (ii)) June 2, The government canceled the haj pilgrimage to Mecca due to COVID-19. . (iii) June 4, The government an easing of restrictions in Jakarta by gradually allowing workplaces, places of worship, shopping centres and recreational venues with strict health guidelines such as a 50% capacity limit and ensuring physical distancing. (iv) June 9, Domestic flights resumed at 70% capacity with observance of strict health protocols.

Ireland 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 9 May 2020).

The government has implemented a wide range of health and containment measures. On March 27, the government has issued strict restrictions on business activity, social distancing and travel - everyone is to stay at home wherever possible with only few exceptions i) to travel to or from work for those providing an essential service; ii) shop for food and medicines; iii) to carry out vital services like caring; iv) brief individual exercise within 2km; v) farming. These measures were extended until May 5th, additionally the government has announced that events with over 5,000 people will not be permitted until the end of August. The authorities have started a five-phase reopening on May 18. Phase (1) included the return of outdoor workers, and small groups of family and friends were permitted to meet in the open; in phase (2) effective as of June 8, small retail outlets and marts where social distancing is possible reopened. With declining infections and increased testing, the authorities have accelerated the initial reopening plan: in phase (3), which took effect on June 29, most businesses have reopened with social distancing measures put in place; in phase (4) effective as of July 20, envisages a continued phased return to work across all sectors. The final phase that allows return to work across all sectors was delayed by three weeks due to the increased community transmission. Schools and colleges will reopen at the beginning of the next academic year in September and October.

Islamic Republic of Iran 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 6 May 2020).

(i) Stopped flights from China, closed schools and malls, key religious sites, banned cultural and religious gatherings, released a high number of prisoners; (ii) March 25, partial lockdown announced, closing of businesses and government offices for two weeks; (iii) Staggered reopening of businesses that are low or average risk in terms spreading the virus; (iv) April 27, reopened all international borders (except Turkmenistan) to revive regional trade.

Italy 12 - Non-Economic Measures IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 9 May 2020).

The nation-wide lockdown, announced in early March, was extended until May 3. Travel is restricted and public gathering are banned. All schools and universities remain shut. Non-essential productive activities are closed across the country, with exceptions for supermarket and grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, public transport and essential public services. The nation-wide lockdown expired on May 4. Since then, manufacturing and construction reopened under new safety rules (e.g., staggered shifts, spaced workstation, temperature checks, masks). The government moved forward some of the reopening plans. In addition to retail shops, restaurants, cafes and hairdressers reopened on May 18 (the initial reopening plan was June 1). Sports facilities reopened on May 25, followed by cinemas and theatres on June 15. Regional governments are allowed the discretion to adjust the dates in both direction. People can now travel within their own region, and mobility restrictions across regions has been lifted on June 3, when international borders also reopen without restriction to and from other EU countries. Following the increase in confirmed cases in early August, re-closures of night clubs are in place until September 7. The obligation to wear masks in public places (including outdoors) is reinforced. Checks at airports will be more intensive.