Economy Measure Code Measure Currency Code Amount (Local) Amount (USD) Source Details
Afghanistan 04 04 - Equity support AFN
Afghanistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AFN IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#U (accessed 9 July 2020)

(i) Screening at ports of entry, quarantine for infected people, and closure of public places for gathering; (ii) Quarantine for infected people; (iii) Closure of public places for gathering; (iv) Social distancing measures, including a three-week lockdown of Kabul (March 28) and Ghazni (April 1) and restricting daily movements to those deemed essentiall (v) Extended the border closures until April 9; (vi) Social distancing measures have included 20 provinces, including Kabul and some other cities, instituting lockdown measures, extended for two weeks on April 12; (vii) Social distancing measures have been extended for 3 weeks on April 17; (viii) Both Houses of Afghanistan’s parliament were put on lockdown on April 29 until end of the national lockdown; (ix) The government also released over 5,300 prisoners to reduce the risk of mass infections in penitentiaries; (x) Schools and universities will remain closed until September; (xi) By end-June, the authorities announced the resumption of domestic and international flights and exports to Europe via the air corridors.

Armenia 04 04 - Equity support AMD
Armenia 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AMD IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 10 June 2020). Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-armenia/armenia-extends-state-of-emergency-over-coronavirus-until-sept-11-idUSL8N2FE1ON (accessed 13 August 2020)

No amount/estimate: The government declared a national state of emergency on March 16, and imposed strict containment measures, including school closures, travel bans on foreign citizens from high risk countries, and imposed fines to those who violate isolation orders during the state of emergency. The state of emergency will be in place until June 14 (now extended until September 11) and encompass movement restrictions. [update] Effective May 4, the movement restrictions are removed and almost all business activities are allowed to operate. This decision is considered a test and stricter restrictions may be implemented again depending on the spread of the virus. Effective June 4, the government declared wearing a face mask in all open public spaces mandatory.

Azerbaijan 04 04 - Equity support AZN
Azerbaijan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AZN IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 24 July 2020); US Embassy in Azerbaijan. https://az.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information-for-azerbaijan/ (accessed 15 July 2020).

(i) To contain the spread of COVID-19, the authorities have introduced a special quarantine regime (until June 15). It includes border closures, required quarantine of returning citizens, prohibition of mass gatherings, and restriction on domestic movements; (ii) The COVID-19 Operational Headquarters has been created under the Cabinet of Ministers, and working groups within various ministries and the CBA have been tasked with developing specific measures. These restrictions are being slowly relaxed starting May 4; (iii) July, Because of the increasing cases of infections, the government announced the decision to prolong a strict quarantine regime until July 20 and special quarantine regime until August 1 .

Bangladesh 04 04 - Equity support BDT
Bangladesh 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures BDT Ministry of Public Administration. https://mopa.gov.bd/sites/default/files/files/mopa.gov.bd/notices/8b82fa43_9c1a_4269_bc9f_dcf378e47fdf/admin1-2020-347-r1.PDF (accsessed 29 June 2020). IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 1 May 2020).

(i) March 23, The government declared a general holiday from March 26 to April 4, which has been extended until May 5: government offices, private offices, and courts will be closed, commercial banks will operate shorter hours; (ii) Individuals have been requested not to leave their homes except to collect daily necessities and emergency supplies, and to wear masks when outside; and (iii) A lockdown has been imposed on 75 hotspots in Dhaka where cases have been identified, and a curfew is in operation from 6pm to 6am.

Bhutan 04 04 - Equity support BTN/INR
Bhutan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures BTN/INR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 24 July 2020); PMO. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/?p=1606 (accessed 20 July 2020); Royal Government of Bhutan. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/?p=1664 (accessed 11 August 2020); Royal Government of Bhutan. https://www.gov.bt/covid19/31-08-20-press-release-pmo/ (accessed 02 September 2020).

(i) Bhutan started imposing containment measures immediately after the first case was recorded on March 6, with restriction of entry of foreign tourists initially for two weeks but extended afterwards and closure of schools in three cities; (ii) March 22, Bhutan sealed off its land borders as a precautionary measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. For non-Bhutanese, exits are allowed. Incoming non-Bhutanese are scrutinized and quarantined where applicable; (iii) March 27, More containment measures were imposed on public gatherings, travel (within and outside Bhutan), business and entertainment, games and sports and civil service, corporate, private, and other agencies. The quarantine period has been extended to April 21; (iv) Healthcare measures include setting up dedicated hospitals and quarantine centers; (v) June 19, Easing of restrictions, which will be done in phases, in schools, institutes, and colleges, except pre-primary levels, low risk businesses, sports, trainings and workshops, religious and social functions, parks and public spaces, and public transport; (vi) June 19, All government, corporate, and allied agencies are called to discontinue "work from home" starting June 22; (vii) August 11, Government announces nationwide lockdown. On September 1, The government announced a phased easing of lockdown restrictions between September 1 and 10 [update].

European Central Bank 04 04 - Equity support EUR
European Central Bank 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures EUR
European Union 04 04 - Equity support EUR 549,000,000 607,300,885 EIB. https://www.eib.org/en/press/all/2020-103-eib-backs-eur5-billion-investment-to-mitigate-economic-impact-of-coronavirus-and-support-medical-technology (accessed 29 April 2020); Yale. https://som.yale.edu/faculty-research-centers/centers-initiatives/program-on-financial-stability/covid-19-crisis (accessed 29 April 2020); EC. https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_1007 (accessed 12 June 2020); EC. https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_1507 (accessed 27 August 2020).

(i) April 8, The Commission is launching ESCALAR, a new investment approach, developed together with the European Investment Fund (EIF), that will support venture capital and growth financing for promising companies. In its pilot phase, ESCALAR will provide up to EUR300 million backed by the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI); (ii) April 24, EIB also approved an equity investment worth EUR75 million for the German company Curevac, through the EIB's Infectious Disease Financing Facility; (iii) June 8, EUR174 million equity investments from the European Innovation Council (EIC) Accelerator Pilot funding to innovative startups and SMEs; (iv) June, EUR5.3 billion for the Solvency Support Instrument that will work via an EU guarantee provided to the European Investment Bank (EIB) Group under the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI). Solvency support will form a separate window under the EFSI to mobilise private capital. The EIB Group will use this guarantee to provide financing directly or invest, fund or guarantee equity funds, special purpose vehicles, investment platforms or national promotional banks. These intermediary funds or vehicles must be established and operate in the EU. The Solvency Support Instrument should predominantly channel solvency support through financial market intermediaries and only to a lesser degree facilitate direct support to companies by the EIB Group [update].

European Union 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures EUR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 29 April 2020).

Most European countries have taken several containment measures ranging from lockdowns and travel restrictions to school closures and bans on large gatherings. Measures that favor teleworking were also widely implemented. The European Commission presented guidelines for exit strategies and called for a common framework across member states. The criteria include: (i) sustained reduction and stabilization of new cases, (ii) sufficient health system capacity such as adequate hospital beds, pharmaceutical products, and equipment, and (iii) appropriate monitoring capacity to quickly detect and isolate infected individuals as well as to trace contacts. The Commission invited Schengen Member States and Schengen Associated States to extend the temporary restriction on non-essential travel to the EU until 15 June and presented further guidance on a gradual lifting of border restrictions .

Georgia 04 04 - Equity support GEL
Georgia 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures GEL IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 23 July 2020); WTO. https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/covid19_e/trade_related_goods_measure_e.htm (accessed 30 July 2020).

(i) The government has declared a national state of emergency (lifted since May 22) and adopted containment measures, including social distancing, lock down of high-risk districts, closure of border crossing, travel ban for foreign visitors, quarantine for nationals returning to Georgia, closure of shops (other than groceries and gas stations) and schools. Georgian railways resumed June 15, with the passenger train routes: Tbilisi-Batumi, Tbilisi-Zugdidi, Tbilisi-Poti, Tbilisi-Ozurgeti, Tbilisi-Kutaisi. Georgian National Tourism Administration says local travelers are able to visit different parts of Georgia for tourism from today; re-opening of international tourism has been postponed to September; (ii) A mandatory curfew is now in place, requiring the population to remain indoors from 21:00 to 06:00; (iii) All individuals must carry an identity document when outside of their dwelling (on foot or otherwise). Stricter restrictions on movement are in place for individuals aged 70 and above; (iv) Other forms of economic activity, including tourism, has come to a standstill. As of May 5, construction, production of construction materials, carwash, computer and equipment repair shops, and parks will open; (v) Effective 3 April 2020 to 10 May 2020, Temporary export ban on diagnostic or laboratory reagents on a backing, prepared diagnostic or laboratory reagents whether or not on a backing, etc.; (vi) Effective July 13, outdoor cultural events and indoor rehearsals are allowed. Public outdoor gatherings of less than 200 people is also allowed.

India 04 04 - Equity support INR
India 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures INR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 10 June 2020).

(i) March 21, A temporary ban for a week on international flights landing in the country for a week; (ii) March 26, Extended ban on all international flights till April 15th, excluding approved all-cargo operations and flights; (iii) March 5, Schools closed in some of the municipalities and states, including Delhi until the end of March, which was eventually expanded to all educational insttitutions in the country; (iv) March 12, Partial shutdowns was imposed on educational institutions, stadiums, cinema halls, and sports clubs and gathering of people were banned in some of the states, including Delhi; (v) March 24, The entire country was placed under lockdown for 21 days which, on April 14, was further extended to May 17; (vi) April 15, the government announced several relaxation measures in geographical areas designated as non-hotspot, with effect from April 20, 2020; (vii) May 30, the government issued ‘Unlock 1’ guidelines for a phased re-opening of most activities across the country and limiting the lockdown only to containment zones for a month until June 30. However, states have been empowered to prohibit certain activities if they deem it necessary.

Kazakhstan 04 04 - Equity support KZT
Kazakhstan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures KZT OECD. https://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/en/ (accessed 8 July 2020). IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 30 July 2020)

(i) April 21, Kazakhstan bans livestock export for 6 months; April 27: (ii) The quarantine regime is extended until 11 May. The government is preparing a plan to ease the measures in cities and regions where the situation with the virus is under control; (iii) Flights between Nur-Sultan and Almaty will start operating starting from May 1; (iv) The schooling has been moved online, and will last after May 11, however technical difficulties have been reported; (v) The State Commission On Ensuring the State of Emergency is preparing a list of businesses that will resume their activities, which includes industrial enterprises, construction and road construction companies, transport companies, banks and public service centres; (vi) April 30, The city of Almaty announced that Almaty residents are authorised to move to their countryside houses (datcha) and to go to city's playgrounds and parks under certain time and people restrictions; (vii) The state of emergency has been lifted as of May 11. Quarantine is maintained but measures will be gradually relaxed; (viii) Internal flights have resumed, but borders remain closed to non-citizens, as well as international flights from Covid-19 affected countries; (ix) The visa exemption for 56 countries (including EU and France) has been suspended until 1 November; (x) As of May 20, WHO has approved a Kazakh COVID-19 vaccine for preclinical trials; (xi) Cash withdrawals limits will be temporarily imposed on legal entities starting early June. A pilot biometric information center has been launched to help banks identify customers in order to provide remote banking services; (xii) Full reopening of kindergartents, movie theaters and children's playgrounds in shopping centers was postponed in Nur-Sultan is postponed. Only kindergartens in small groups of no more than 15 children might continue the operation; (xiii) Starting on July 5, a two-week strict nation-wide lockdown is reintroduced in the country following a surge in cases since the first lockdown and emergency state was lifed on 11 May. On July 15, the government extended the lockdown for another two weeks to August 2.

Kyrgyz Republic 04 04 - Equity support KGS
Kyrgyz Republic 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures KGS World Trade Organization (WTO). https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/covid19_e/trade_related_goods_measure_e.htm (accessed 19 April 2020); IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accesed 13 April 2020, 17 May 2020, 26 May 2020; 24 June 2020); CAREC Institute (accessed 26 May 2020, 11 June 2020); Kabar. http://en.kabar.kg/news/turkey-uae-resume-flights-with-kyrgyzstan/ (accessed 8 August 2020).

(i) Effective March 22 for 6 months (a) temporary export ban on wipes, other antibacterial products, and disinfectants, and (b) temporary export ban on certain food products like wheat, meslin, etc.; (ii) April, The authorities have taken drastic measures to prevent the outbreak including (a) the closure of borders with People's Republic of China where 36% of imports of goods originate, (b) border restrictions with Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, (c) the quarantine of people coming from abroad, (d) a lockdown of all non-essential activities, and (e) a curfew; (iii) May 10, The state of emergency ended and the curfew was lifted while the quarantine regime will work until the stabilization of the epidemiological situation; (iv) May 21, Large shopping centers have opened; (v) May 25, Public transport has opened; (vi) May 25, Cafes and restaurants fitting no more than 50 people have been allowed to resume operation in Bishkek; (vii) From June 5, domestic flights and public transport between the regions of Kyrgyz Republic restarted; (viii) From June 8, restriction on visits to religious institutions is lifted; (ix) June 15, International flights resumed; (ix) August 7, The Kyrgyz Republic resumed its international flights with Turkey and United Arab Emirates.

Maldives 04 04 - Equity support MVR
Maldives 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures MVR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 19 April 2020, 14 May 2020, 4 June 2020, 22 July 2020); The Edition. https://edition.mv/news/16934 (accessed 29 May 2020). The Edition. https://edition.mv/news/18190 (accessed 31 July 2020). The Edition. https://edition.mv/news/18275 (accessed 7 August 2020). The Edition. https://edition.mv/news/18890 (accessed 4 September 2020).

(i) March 12, The government declared a Public Health Emergency. There are several adopted containment measures, including (a) temporary suspension of on-arrival visa for all passengers arriving to Maldives by air and sea, (b) quarantine for all passengers traveling to Maldives by air except for tourists checking-in to resorts, (c) screening at ports of entry, (d) restrictions on travel between resorts and inhabited islands, (e) ban on all cruise ships from entering and docking; requirement on all guest houses and city hotels operating in the Maldives to temporally suspend all tourist check-ins since March 17, and (f) school closures; (ii) April 15, The greater Malé region was placed on lockdown; (iii) May 13, The lockdown was extended to May 28 (third extension since its implementation); (iv) May 28: (a) The state of Public Health Emergency was extended until June 29; and (b) Phase one of lockdown easing started, with a relaxation in temporary permissions for leaving homes as well as allowing certain commercial businesses to open and operate; (v) Since July 1, the country is in phase three of the lockdown ease plan. This phase permits movement in the Greater Malé Region from 5am to 11pm, and only gatherings of less than 30 people are to be allowed in public spaces; (vi) International flights as well as tourism island resorts reopened; (vii) While guesthouses in inhabited islands are opened since July for locals/residents in COVID-19 free islands, guesthouses will be opened for tourists in August; (vii) July 30, Authorities mandated wearing face masks in public spaces of the capital city of Malé in response to a surge in COVID-19 cases in Maldives. Individuals in public spaces without masks would be fined by MVR1,000 starting from August 1; (viii) August 4, The Health Protection Agency (HPA) implemented a curfew over the Greater Malé Region; (ix) September 3, The Ministry of Education extended the closure of schools in the Greater Malé Region by an additional two weeks in connection to the surge of COVID-19 cases in the area [update].

Nepal 04 04 - Equity support NPR
Nepal 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures NPR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 2 September 2020). Business World. http://www.businessworld.in/article/Nepal-re-enforces-lockdown-as-COVID-19-cases-surge/05-08-2020-305469/ (accessed 6 August 2020); The Kathmandu Post. https://kathmandupost.com/politics/2020/08/12/nepal-braces-for-a-return-to-locked-down-life-as-rise-in-covid-19-cases-rings-alarm-bells (accessed 13 August 2020); Nepali Times. https://www.nepalitimes.com/latest/repatriation-regular-flights-to-nepal-to-resume/ (accessed 26 August 2020); Online Khabar. https://english.onlinekhabar.com/nepal-extends-suspension-on-long-route-transport-domestic-flights-until-sept-16.html (accessed 31 August 2020).

April: (i) Closure of cinema halls, stadiums, health clubs, museums, bars and other recreational places and public transportation until July 22; (ii) Closure of land-border crossings; June: (iii) Nationwide lockdown until July 22; (iv) Ban on domestic and international flights (except chartered flights) until July 22; (v) The government began easing the lockdown on June 12, allowing shops to open; (vi) Government, private offices, and banks have reopened from June 15, with government staff working in shifts; (vii) Private vehicles are allowed to operate on an alternating odd-even license-plate-number basis, corresponding to the calendar date; (viii) July 20, The government announced that the national lockdown will be lifted. Services, such as hotels and restaurants, will resume operations from July 30. All flights and transportation will be resumed from August 17. Tourism activities including travel, trekking, mountaineering will also resume operations from August 17. However, recreational activities including parties, seminars, and other public gatherings continue to be restricted. Educational institutions, recreational centers, religious centers, gyms, libraries, museums, and zoos will be closed until further notice; (ix) August 5, The Nepal government has enforced partial lockdown to full lockdown in various parts of the country as cases of coronavirus infection and fatalities continued to soar. The Home Ministry released a list of 14 districts: six districts will be facing a complete restriction in movement, while eight would remain under partial lockdown; (x) August 11, Other containment measures include restrictions on domestic and international passenger flights until August 31; long distance buses will now be allowed to ply from September 1; all educational institutions including schools, colleges, tuition centres and training centers will remain closed. No date for their opening has been announced; restaurants have been limited to takeaway services and all non-essential services like salons, shopping malls, theatres must remain closed; opening of hotels which was supposed to start on August 17, has been pushed back by 15 days; (xi) August 25, The government announced that it will resume flights to repatriate Nepali workers stranded abroad until August 31. After that, airlines will be allowed to operate limited regular international flights. The government has also reversed its earlier requirement that all passengers, even those with PCR reports, have to spend at least one week in a hotel quarantine in Kathmandu at their own expense. Passengers with PCR negative reports will now be allowed to go home for 14 day self-isolation [update]; (xii) August 31, The government has extended the suspension on long-route transportation and domestic flights until September 16. International flights will resume on September 1, but only for Nepalis and diplomats (no foreign tourists). The government also decided to continue the suspension on the operation of schools, colleges and academic institutions until September 16 [update].

Pakistan 04 04 - Equity support PKR
Pakistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures PKR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 8 May 2020; 15 May 2020); Reuters. https://reut.rs/2ATqjV8 (accessed 26 May 2020); Tribune. https://bit.ly/2zMVWz1 (accessed 1 June 2020); The Express Tribune. https://bit.ly/37J1ZRV (accessed 2 June 2020); The Express Tribune. https://tribune.com.pk/story/2256907/strict-lockdown-to-be-imposed-in-punjab-for-10-days-from-tonight-chohan (accessed 28 July 2020); SAMAA. https://www.samaa.tv/news/pakistan/2020/08/balochistan-smart-lockdown-extended/ (accessed 4 August 2020).

(i) Quarantines in localized areas; (ii) Closed borders with neighboring countries; (iii) International travel restrictions; (iv) School and university closures; (v) Cancellation and banning of public events; (vi) Social distancing measures; (vii) Varying levels of lockdown in cities and provinces across the country; (viii) The federal government in coordination with provinces had partially eased the lockdown since April 15, by allowing ‘low-risk industries’ to restart operation with newly developed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). This partial lockdown will be further eased on May 9, to allow the opening of several industrial units and small retail shops in phases and using proper SOPs. Educational institutes are expected to reopen starting July 15; (ix) May 19, The Supreme Court ordered the government to lift some remaining restrictions imposed on business, in particular shopping malls be reopened and curbs to be lifted on business opening on the weekends; (x) May 29, The country resumes international flight operations; (xi) June 2, the government announced that all the businesses would be open except the ones that are considered in the negative list; (xii) July 27, Strict lockdown imposed in Punjab for 10 days; (xiii) August 4, Balochistan will extend the lockdown until August 17.

Sri Lanka 04 04 - Equity support LKR
Sri Lanka 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures LKR IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 2 September 2020); SLRM. Covid-10 policy responses repository as of 25 August 2020; Ministry of Mass Media. https://www.media.gov.lk/media-gallery/latest-news/2507-schools-to-re-open-today (accessed 13 August 2020).

(i) March 11, suspension of visa on arrival for tourists; (ii) March 13, schools and universities closed until April 20; (iii) March 19, government declared a work-from-home arrangement for the public and private sectors, which was extended until April 20; (iv) March 20, The authorities suspended all arriving international flights and ships, while imposing a strict nation-wide curfew, which was gradually eased on May 11, and was fully relaxed on June 6; barring large public gatherings; (v) March 22, All inbound passenger flights and passenger ships suspended, excluding repatriations; (vi) March 23, An island-wide curfew was imposed; (vii) March 26, essential services, including central bank, commercial banks, insurance services, and treasury, remained open; (viii) April 20, All forms of functions, pilgrimages and pleasure tours, carnivals, processions and meetings continued to be banned; (ix) June 29, Night-time curfew removed across the island. Gatherings continue to be subject to public health guidelines. Use of masks in public remains mandatory. All schools to reopen under five stages from June 29 to August 10 [update]; (x) August 10, Local schools have been allowed to reopen in several phases so as to prevent overcrowding within confined spaces. Accordingly certain days of the week have been reserved for particular grades and students to attend school.

Tajikistan 04 04 - Equity support TJS
Tajikistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures TJS IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 6 August 2020); Aljazeera. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/08/tajikistan-reopens-schools-measures-prevent-covid-19-200817193947792.html (accessed 18 August 2020).

April: (i) The authorities have instituted a high-level task force and taken a range of measures to contain the spread of the virus, including border closures, travel restrictions, and suspending prayers at mosques; (ii) The task force is preparing for potential outbreak by arranging testing labs, medical equipment, supplies, and personnel across the country; (iii) May, All schools will remain closed until May 10; (iv) On June 6, the government presented a reopening plan which includes (a) resuming operations of bazaars, cafes, beauty and hairdressing salons, and barber shops along other businesses starting on June 15. All businesses must adhere strict cautionary measures, including regular disinfection of premises and observance of social distancing; and (b) while restrictions on public transport will be removed and intercity travel remains open, international flights are not expected to resume until further notice; (v) August 18, Schools reopened after 4 months with measures to prevent COVID-19.

Turkmenistan 04 04 - Equity support TMT
Turkmenistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures TMT IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 26 May 2020).

(i) The authorities have adopted a wide range of measures to prevent a COVID-19 outbreak in the country, including closure of borders, flight cancellations and rerouting, and mandatory COVID-19 testing for arriving travelers; (ii) Starting March 24, all sports events have been cancelled. Gyms and sports clubs have been shut down in Ashgabat; (iii) The authorities have imposed restrictions on internal movement, closed roads between some provinces, and stopped rail transportation; (iv) Starting from March 24, only Turkmen freight carriers are allowed to transport cargo in Turkmenistan; (v) The authorities have stepped up efforts to digitalize government services, expand e-commerce, and facilitate online and phone payments by SMEs and SOEs through banks; (vi) A commission has been set up for the purchase of essential supplies, medicines, construction equipment, etc.

Uzbekistan 04 04 - Equity support UZS
Uzbekistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures UZS IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#U (accessed 8 May 2020).

(i) Restricting travel (including international flights, domestic public transportation, and movement by car); (ii) Closing borders (except for trade), closing schools and universities and all stores except grocery stores and pharmacies; (iii) Quarantine and self-isolation measures; (iv) Cancelling public events and religious gatherings; (iv) Uzbekistan will keep quarantine and zoning or red, yellow and green zones depending upon coronavirus situation until August 1; (v) Uzbekistan restarts international flights to the countries with improved epidemiological situation since June 15. Flights are allowed to diplomats, specialists of foreign companies working in Uzbekistan in investment projects, people crossing the country by transit, foreign citizens registered in Uzbekistan and citizens of Uzbekistan registered abroad.

Afghanistan 04 04 - Equity support AFN
Afghanistan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AFN IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19#U (accessed 6 May 2020)

(i) Screening at ports of entry, quarantine for infected people, and closure of public places for gathering; (ii) Quarantine for infected people; (iii) Closure of public places for gathering; (iv) Social distancing measures, including a three-week lockdown of Kabul (March 28) and Ghazni (April 1) and restricting daily movements to those deemed essentiall (v) Extended the border closures until April 9; (vi) Social distancing measures have included 20 provinces, including Kabul and some other cities, instituting lockdown measures, extended for two weeks on April 12; (vii) social distancing measures have been extended for 3 weeks on April 17; (viii) Both Houses of Afghanistan’s parliament were put on lockdown on April 29 until end of the national lockdown; (ix) The government also released over 5,300 prisoners to reduce the risk of mass infections in penitentiaries.

Armenia 04 04 - Equity support AMD
Armenia 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AMD IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 10 June 2020).

No amount/estimate: The government declared a national state of emergency on March 16, and imposed strict containment measures, including school closures, travel bans on foreign citizens from high risk countries, and imposed fines to those who violate isolation orders during the state of emergency. The state of emergency will be in place until June 14 and encompass movement restrictions. Effective May 4, the movement restrictions are removed and almost all business activities are allowed to operate. This decision is considered a test and stricter restrictions may be implemented again depending on the spread of the virus. Effective June 4, the government declared wearing a face mask in all open public spaces mandatory. [update]

Azerbaijan 04 04 - Equity support AZN
Azerbaijan 12 12 - Non-Economic Measures AZN IMF. https://www.imf.org/en/Topics/imf-and-covid19/Policy-Responses-to-COVID-19 (accessed 11 June 2020).

(i) To contain the spread of COVID-19, the authorities have introduced a special quarantine regime (until June 15) [update]. It includes border closures, required quarantine of returning citizens, prohibition of mass gatherings, and restriction on domestic movements; (ii) The COVID-19 Operational Headquarters has been created under the Cabinet of Ministers, and working groups within various ministries and the CBA have been tasked with developing specific measures. These restrictions are being slowly relaxed starting May 4.